• Cassie Gordon

First Post on CassieGordonArchaeology.com!

Updated: Oct 17, 2020

I'm so glad you found your way to my fresh new digs — maybe not all the way to Melbourne — but at least you found my place in the blogosphere! Now that you are here let me introduce myself…

I’m Cassie (shock horror!) and I’m into archaeology (double shock horror)! I value communication of archaeological research so towards the end of 2020 I’d like to share some of what I’ve been working on this year, looking into how people respond during periods of collapse. Lockdowns during the Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic have challenged how I experience time (time slipping; time viscosity) and subsequently have made me think about time conceptualisations in archaeology.


When I wasn’t procrasti-fermenting with sourdough starters and whacky kombucha flavours on the side this year I was obsessing over how we think about and communicate our time conceptualisations in archaeology (and why we don't), and it made me wonder how we can use visual art and poetic expression to consider time.

The festival CHAT 2020 was like the perfect opportunity to launch this blog, incubating in isolation for about six months now ... just like me! I’ve got some grand ideas about what this space will look like:

I want to know what, and who, you might want to read about.


"There is nothing permanent except change"

As the pre-Socratic Greek philosopher Heraclitus put it, “There is nothing permanent except change” so stick with me while we get into the swing of it! Don’t hesitate to throw me a line, or to add your thoughts or questions to the comments section of my posts. I am eager to hear from you.


Let’s go with the flow and be flexible with the structure here. As my mother, quoting Tommy Cooper, always used to say, “I used to be indecisive but now I’m not too sure”… Cooper did wear a fez. Should I wear a fez now? Fezzes are cool…




The Cover Image (also embedded in the post) is "Tommy Cooper" 2006 by dullhunk and is licensed under CC BY 2.0

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© 2020 by Cassie Gordon as part of CassieGordonArchaeology.com

I acknowledge the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as the traditional custodians of the land on which I live. I acknowledge that the land of this country was stolen and that sovereignty was never ceded. I pay my respects to all elders past, present, and emerging.